The Green Paper Making Process

25 06 2014

Paper has been a part of the human culture for generations since the Chinese invented it in 105 AD. Paper became a highly demanded commodity in 1453 with the invention of the printing press. The materials used to create it included linen and old cotton. These soon fell out of style as there were not enough raw materials to sustain the growing demand. It was not until 1719 that paper was first made out of wood pulp. Then, with the invention of a machine that created sheets of paper in 1806, modern paper-making finally came into existence. Being unsatisfied with the constant need to abuse natural resources, a recycled paper making process was created. The following steps is how Green Printer describes this process.

Step 1: Collect the Paper
Clean paper (free from food and other contaminates) is collected by a recycling company and transported to the local recycling center. Once there, the paper is sorted, wrapped tightly in large bales, and shipped to a paper mill where it can be processed and turned into new paper. When it arrives, the paper is sorted into stacks of the types of things in can make (such as cardboard or newspaper). 

Step 2: Pulp the Paper
When it is time to process the paper, it is loaded onto a conveyor belt that moves it to a machine known as a pulper. This pulper cuts the paper into tiny pieces, mixes it with a combination of water and chemicals, and heats the mixture in order to break down the solid matter into bits known as fiber. This mixture is called pulp. The pulp is filtered through screens to remove tiny bits of contaminants like glue.

Step 3: Wash the Paper
Now that pulp is fully processed, the recycling center washes or deinks the paper. This generally involves spinning the pulp in a cylinder to separate out staples and other debris. The pulp is then rinsed with water to wash out the final pieces of unwanted material.

Step 4: Beat the Paper
Final refinement happens when the pulp undergoes beating to cause the fibers to swell, making them ideal for the final step in making paper. If the paper needs to be white or colored, the bleach or dye is added during this step.

Step 5: Produce the Paper
The now clean pulp mixture is sprayed onto a large screen and moved through machines that press out all water, leaving nothing but new sheets of recycled paper.



EcoCalculator: A Tool to Identify Environmental Impact When Printing Green

21 05 2014

Organizations that adopt eco-friendly business practices are highly valued in today’s society. Many companies enforce different activities to highlight their desire to be green. Although this is a great step forward, most businesses are unaware of the actual impact of their changes. To address this issue, Green Printer uses an EcoCalculator. This tool measures the impact that every green order has on the environment.

The general drive behind green printing is the idea of saving trees. However, there are other essential details that are often overlooked when choosing a printing company. The other positive environmental changes that take place when printing green are denoted below.

Each order’s environmental savings are measured and added to the client’s previous orders by Green Printer through the EcoCalculator. This calculations are done automatically and are readily available for clients to download for their own records.

 



Gifting Green on Mother’s Day

6 05 2014

First and foremost, happy mother’s day to all the amazing mothers of the world. Motherhood is well known for being a very difficult job with no financial reward. A woman that has entered motherhood gives everything and asks for nothing in exchange. This act of kindness is celebrated in North America on the second Sunday of May. During this time, all moms are showered with gifts, poems, and unique art pieces created specially for them by their precious children. As sons and daughters grow up, the idea of gift giving on mother’s day becomes much more centered around a high priced tag. However, since moms are the most selfless of all beings, they often prefer Do-It-Yourself (DIY) crafts that reflect the effort put into creating the gift.

There are many DIY projects that can be developed for this special occasion. Most of these projects can be created using recyclable materials. As you might have guessed, the team at Green Printer is highly engaged in promoting these ideas. As an enthusiast of environmental friendliness, the office took on the challenge of creating a newspapers flower for all those special moms out there. Below are some snapshots of the team’s masterpiece.

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Although it is nice to have a specific day to celebrate motherhood, it is important to remember that a mother’s love is unconditional. As such, the celebration of this love should be an ongoing act. This does not have to correlate with high expenditure but rather with creativity and environmental friendliness. After all, moms are the pioneers of green living and recycling.

 



Recycle Your Cartons!

15 09 2011

Here’s an update from the Environmental News Network about carton recycling, one of the newest recycling movements in the US:

Cartons are recyclable! Made mainly from paper, cartons are in demand to be recycled into new paper products.

The Carton Council is committed to increasing carton recycling in the United States. By promoting both recycling technology and local collection programs they work to limit the number of valuable cartons that end up in a landfill.

The Carton Council, formed by four of the country’s leading carton manufacturers—Elopak, Evergreen Packaging, SIG Combibloc and Tetra Pak, is specifically committed to increasing carton recycling in the United States. Made mainly from paper, a renewable resource from responsibly managed forests, cartons are recyclable. By promoting both recycling technology and local collection programs, the Carton Council is planning to limit the amount of cartons that end up in a landfill.

The implementation of carton recycling in Dallas is the latest example of a national trend.  In 2008, only 18 percent of U.S. households had access to carton recycling programs.  Today, this number has nearly doubled to almost 36%, with cities in over 40 states representing approximately 40 million households now accepting cartons in their curbside collection programs.  Dallas increases these numbers by an additional 235,000 households, and is setting the bar for other cities in the state of Texas to follow suit.  Dallas also joins a growing number of cities across the country such as Los Angeles, New York, and Boston that have expanded their recycling programs to include cartons.

Last year, the City of Dallas recycled more than 50,000 tons of materials and is on track to recycle nearly 65,000 tons this year.  Carton recycling will help the city toward their 31% diversion goal for the year.  By increasing their recycling rate and coming up with innovative ways to increase waste diversion, the city saved $1,185,260.21 of landfill space.

For further information:  http://recyclecartons.com/

Even if you don’t live in an area that is offering carton recycling, you can encourage your local community to ask for this program to be implemented! Let local officials know that you’re interested in the latest advances in protecting the environment!



How to Make Your Brochures Look Good (5 Easy Steps Towards an Effective Brochure Design)

18 03 2010

Making a brochure is one thing everyone is able to do today with all of the countless brochure producing software out there on the Web. People that don’t have enough time or even the desire of creating their very own brochures may always use a printing company that offers brochure printing, as well as postcard printing and greeting card printing, that can be found both offline and online at an affordable price. Having said that, it’s these essential tips to develop a high quality brochure that need to be taken into account when coming up with a brochure.

1. Prior to making your brochure, gather and analyze other brochures distributed in your area. Uncover precisely what causes a particular style and design to be more captivating than the others. By thoroughly researching other designs, it is possible to acquire your own feeling of excellent design so that you can come up with an attractive brochure. Upon having a concept of exactly what the brochure ought to look like, you must determine which type of people that you intend to distribute your brochure to once it is printed. Pick a typeface that is most suitable for the style you want, such as a professional, funny or informal one, along with maintaining a straightforward message. Avoid using more than two fonts in the brochure as this tends to distract readers from grasping the core subject matter.

2. Determine which details are essential and organize it according to its value. Produce several drafts of the brochure layout until you can completely visualize where all of the information will be placed. Use design elements like boxes only when highlighting the most important content so that it is easy to follow. Have a friend or fellow employee take a look at your draft concept and ask them if it appears to flow in a logical order that is easy to follow along. You can even ask them what was the main message they extracted from the brochure to ensure you have a proper layout.

3. When designing a brochure it is common to feel the desire to make use of the page and fill up the entire space, however it is best to avoid doing so. When you leave empty space on the page and maintain a simple layout it helps deliver the message to the reader without any confusion. Pictures and graphics are useful, but too many will make the brochure look messy as well as distract the reader from the main purpose.

4. You will find a huge selection of colors available for brochure printing, but the best performing brochures are almost always designed in just one or two colors. Occasionally, grayscale brochures end up being far more stunning than colored brochures. Do not forget that the expense of printing must be evaluated when selecting colors for your brochure. More colors usually means a higher printing cost, but at the same time if your brochure is in need of many colors to generate results and improve your business then avoid trying to cut the costs here. After deciding on the colors, you will need to choose the type of paper for your brochure. Paper is also available in many different colors, dimensions and materials. If you are trying to go green in your business or organization then you may look at using recycled paper. Recycled paper is an ideal way to cut down on the amount of natural resources you use and it’s also a wonderful way to promote yourself these days as more and more people are becoming environmentally conscious. Use recycled paper when doing brochure printing, postcard printing or greeting card printing, and you will certainly stand out with your audience.

5. Upon finishing the design and picking the typeface and paper for your brochure, you must always proofread and analyze your brochure. Go through it quite a few times prior to getting it printed because once it is printed you won’t be able to fix any mistakes you might catch afterwards. As mentioned earlier, it is a good idea to have another person you trust to critically evaluate the final layout and provide their honest opinion. After you have rigorously review the brochure and feel content, then contact the printing company and begin having it printed.

Keep these points in mind when creating the perfect brochure design and you too will have an effective brochure that produces action, brings results and drastically improves your business or organization.



Ads Made of Sea Water: Three reasons to re-imagine your design

3 06 2009

A www.greenprinteronline.com dispatch.

This week, we scoured Google, we marveled and finally chose three design resources, trends and case studies from around the globe that inspire in their boundary pushing work. You’ll probably re-think using the colour green in your branding palette. And that’s a good thing.

1. Did you ever wonder what all those old marketing posters for saving the endangered spotted owls could be made out of? In 1980s, you could have conjured nasty words like ‘subterranean chemicals’ or ‘volatile organic compounds‘ (VOCs). Read the rest of this entry »



Core Industry’s MacMurray on ‘Garden Electric’ and making the invisible visible

25 05 2009

Thank you to Daniel Schutzsmith for this fabulous tip.

Green Printer has interviewed rockstar interactive and strategic marketing, design and development firm Core Industries before (who clients include Live Earth, Pepsi and 1% for the Planet) and has been in touch with Megan MacMurray, Production Designer at the agency.

So, we were excited to learn that the Brooklyn-based MacMurray, along with fellow artist Angela Pablo, showcased her Garden Electric exhibit at the Futuresonic Festival and Conference in Manchester, England. Read the rest of this entry »



Clearly Green Design on “zag!” and bucking the marketing trend

20 05 2009

A Green Printer “Design Goes Green” dispatch. An interview with Deb Ozarko, Director, Creative Services of Clearly Green Design.

[digg=Being “green”, socially aware and committed to the planet doesn’t mean that design solutions have to be serious and dull]

1. If a client comes to you saying that they want to market themselves as a green company, what kinds of advice would you give them in terms of identity and design?
Before I would give them any advice, I would accurately determine their motives. As both a visual communicator and a social/environmental activist, I have a very large responsibility to the public and the planet – as well as my own personal ethics. Clearly Green Design takes our commitment to the environment, animals and social justice causes very seriously so its critical that we understand the motivating factors for a company before we go any further. A green claim or green identity no longer has the same validity that they used to because of excessive greenwashing. Greenwash is rampant because so many companies have simply jumped on the green bandwagon in order to keep up with the trend. Personally, I find this really sad because there is alot at stake here – namely, planetary survival. A glaring example of greenwash are the green claims made by the Walmart corporation. I honestly don’t know how the folks at the communications agency who market Walmart can sleep at night. Read the rest of this entry »



Substance 151: Modular design systems and visual vocabularies

30 04 2009

By contributing guest author Ida Cheinman, Principal and Creative Director of Substance 151, a strategic design agency for Green Printer‘s “Design Goes Green” series.

We live in a time when “sustainability” is topping the buzzword charts and a wave of greenwashing is flooding the mainstream. We live in a time of intense competition, gloomy economic forecasts and rapidly disappearing marketing budgets, but also in a time when more and more companies and organizations strive to uphold higher environmental and social values, making the shift to the triple bottom line economic model. Sustainability and social responsibility are the forces that drive many of today’s business decisions; they also change the way organizations re-think their branding and marketing strategies. As marketers and business leaders, we are faced with the challenge of finding differentiation by creating empowering and memorable brand experiences for our audiences in the increasingly crowded sustainable marketplace.

So, What are the rules? Read the rest of this entry »



Wild, green business card ideas to re-ignite your brand

22 04 2009

So, the economy is down the tubes and it’s all over the tube.

Why not take this time to incubate your business (from a caterpillar into a butterfly metamorphosis, if you will) and re-invest in your brand.

This is likely a slower client year than most businesses may be used to so lack of time is no excuse not to get started. And money?  When business is scarce for your retail neighbours down the street, consider that suppliers may be more willing than usual to negotiate high volume orders. Read the rest of this entry »