EcoCalculator: A Tool to Identify Environmental Impact When Printing Green

21 05 2014

Organizations that adopt eco-friendly business practices are highly valued in today’s society. Many companies enforce different activities to highlight their desire to be green. Although this is a great step forward, most businesses are unaware of the actual impact of their changes. To address this issue, Green Printer uses an EcoCalculator. This tool measures the impact that every green order has on the environment.

The general drive behind green printing is the idea of saving trees. However, there are other essential details that are often overlooked when choosing a printing company. The other positive environmental changes that take place when printing green are denoted below.

Each order’s environmental savings are measured and added to the client’s previous orders by Green Printer through the EcoCalculator. This calculations are done automatically and are readily available for clients to download for their own records.

 



Decreasing Carbon Footprints

15 05 2014

May is one of the most exciting months of the year for environmental enthusiasts in North America. During this time, many Canadians and Americans commit to riding their bicycles to work. Last year alone, 19,860 individuals participated in the bike to work week event in Canada. This stopped 170,516 kilograms of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If this took place within one week alone, imagine the changes that could result from implementing alternatives to driving on a daily basis. To continue with this momentum, Green Printer explored some of the opportunities available for other fellow environmental enthusiasts who want to really change the world.

  • Go for a walk: Walking is only applicable when going shorter distances. This is an enjoyable method of getting from point A to point B with minimal energy required. It is great for the environment, health, and mind. The monetary costs to walking are zero dollars which also makes the best option financial speaking.
  • Ride a bike: This is a no-brainer for people who live in urban cities within close proximity of their jobs. Riding a bicycle is the most green alternative to getting around town because it reduces pollution, oil, and gas usage. These are not only environmental benefits but also financial benefits. Aside from this, abid bikers gain numerous health benefits from the exercise of the activity.
  • Take public transportation: Transiting to work has several benefits over driving. A full bus is responsible for taking 40 cars off the road. This is the equivalent of 70,000 litres of fuel and 175 tonnes of emission per year. From a financial point of view, riding the bus is much more inexpensive than driving a car. Having said that, it is easier to opt for public transportation in larger cities that support this medium versus smaller cities with less transportation resources.
  • Carpool: If the options above are not feasible, carpooling is the next best thing. This decreases the emissions produced individually while also reducing fuel costs. The ideal scenario would include more than two individuals per car ride. The bonus point of carpooling is getting to know co-workers outside of work which could potentially turn into lifelong friendships.
  • Carshare: This is a great alternative to combine with the methods mentioned above. In this scenario, a car is rented for a certain amount of hours to accommodate traveling for longer distances. Carsharing is a better option than owning a car when using the services only a few times per week.

 



Let’s kill the business card and have an iPhone pow-wow

23 09 2008

A www.greenprinteronline.com dispatch.

Let’s kill the business card, the paper one that is.

Why do we need it anyways? It does that hideous bent corner thing when you take out of your wallet (excuse us “Mr. That’s-why-I-get-my-cards-lamented”, you are an exception), the VP of Financial Genius gets tossed next to the Hatha yoga instructor and besides, that font you chose, with painstaking care, is ugly anyways. Read the rest of this entry »



Earth Hour: Tooth fairy delusion or one hour vigil?

29 03 2008

Image source: http://timblair.net | Lights out for Sydney, Australia 2007

An http://greenprinteronline.com dispatch.

Earth Hour is tonight, March 29th from 8 to 9 pm. The idea is to turn off the lights as a symbolic gesture that us citizens, business owners, uber-corporations (hello, Google’s black screen, hello McDonalds in Toronto saving 10 000 kilowatt hours) local governments and non-profit groups are taking climate change seriously.

Despite gripes that Earth Hour falls on the NCAA basketball regional, it’s lights out for over 23 major cities worldwide like Toronto and Bangkok. Read the rest of this entry »



A green biz guide to recycling electronics – Origin Design does “Mission Zero”

2 03 2008

 

Photos by Chris Jordan | “Intolerable Beauty: Portraits of American Mass Consumption”

Design Goes Green – The first of a series of articles by Green Printer on the cross-section between the environment, business and the creative communications industry.

According to the federal Environmental Protection Agency, used or unwanted electronics amounted to 1.9 to 2.2 million tons in 2005, with most of that ending up in landfills. We did a post earlier on the how the chemicals that seep into the soil, even decades later, can have harmful human health effects and the fact that heaps of the stuff are often left abandoned in developing countries. Read the rest of this entry »



The “Story of Stuff”: too Mulch Design?

25 01 2008

Image source: www.inhabitat.com

Design Goes Green – The first of a series of articles by Green Printer on the cross-section between the environment, business and the creative communications industry.

Today, I caught the “story of stuff“: a 20-minute, fast-paced look at the dark underbelly of our consumption patterns. The clip exposes the links between a host of environmental and social issues while showing you the real cost of that $5 radio (metals from South Africa, 14 years olds from the Congo dropping out of school to work in factories…). Read the rest of this entry »



Green Your Ad Material: easy trends for 2008

16 01 2008

Image Source: World Wildlife Federation – caption “15 km squared of rain forest disappears every minute”

A Design Goes Green Series by www.greenprinteronline.com.

Kevin Thompson of Rising Phoenix Design shares easy tips to green your advertising and marketing material in 2008.

Less is more.
If you’re smart, you can say a lot with very little. Thompson swears by low ink coverage for all Rising Phoenix Design printed pieces to create the sexy white space that you saw the big name ad firms use in their 2007 marketing material (the “Dear Ketel One Drinker. Can you find the subliminal message in this advertisement?” Followed by two-thirds of a page of white space ring a bell?) Read the rest of this entry »



Xerox slashes emissions 18% below 2002 levels and saves $18M

28 12 2007

Image source: akamaitech.net
Through innovation in their paper and ink use and operational changes, Xerox reduced its greenhouse gas emissions 18 percent below 2002 levels. The move saved the company $18 million dollars and spurred a new, more stringent goal of driving down emissions 25 percent below that 2002 baseline. Printing green has gone corporate mainstream.



Amazon’s Kindle signals paper-less books and… eWaste?

23 11 2007

(Image source: responsiblechina.com (c) 2007)

This is cool. Here’s what we tree huggers at Green Printer thought when we heard about the new Kindle, a kind of an iPod by Amazon that could replace your paper books, magazines and newspapers: “woo-hoo, no more trees to make books!”

Amazon chief executive Jeff Bezos called the gadget, “the most important thing we’ve ever done” which got us thinking that he probably wants to protect all those Amazon rainforests just like us… Read the rest of this entry »



Just another silly “Save Trees. Print only when necessary” email signature?

20 11 2007


Video: UNEP – Amazon Deforestation in Google EarthA greenprinteronline.com dispatch.
We’ve become a letter-writing society.Sure, our 16th century relatives may have written and sent a couple of hand-written letters to their loved ones via “dove” (the bird, not the soap brand), it’s us that have set the bar for most letters – electronic ones – sent in world history.

In fact, it’s estimated that 97 billion e-mails whisk through cyberspace every day. And according to GreenPrint Technologies, despite 20th century predictions of a paperless office, Americans use enough sheets every year to build a 10-foot-high wall that would stretch from New York to Tokyo and beyond. Read the rest of this entry »