EcoCalculator: A Tool to Identify Environmental Impact When Printing Green

21 05 2014

Organizations that adopt eco-friendly business practices are highly valued in today’s society. Many companies enforce different activities to highlight their desire to be green. Although this is a great step forward, most businesses are unaware of the actual impact of their changes. To address this issue, Green Printer uses an EcoCalculator. This tool measures the impact that every green order has on the environment.

The general drive behind green printing is the idea of saving trees. However, there are other essential details that are often overlooked when choosing a printing company. The other positive environmental changes that take place when printing green are denoted below.

Each order’s environmental savings are measured and added to the client’s previous orders by Green Printer through the EcoCalculator. This calculations are done automatically and are readily available for clients to download for their own records.

 



Corporate Social Responsibility: How Far Does Your Business Go?

13 05 2014

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is a trending topic for many organizations. As mentioned in an earlier posts, most businesses practice some form of CSR activity. This has not only created a tighter gap for differentiation, but it has also made consumers question the transparency of companies’ claims. It is crucial for business owners to understand the different responsibilities that compose CSR and promote their activities accordingly to avoid misconceptions of their efforts.

Mandatory Responsibilities

Mandatory responsibilities are the main reason for which CSR has gained popularity. These are responsibilities that companies must fulfill in order to survive as business entities. There are two specific responsibilities under this section: Economic and Legal.

Economic Responsibilities

Prior to looking at the outside world, organizations must address their financial standings. Profitability should be top-of-mind for all businesses. Companies that are profitable create job opportunities for their communities. Aside from this, these businesses can invest in activities to participate in other responsibilities.

Legal Responsibilities

This section of CSR pertains to legal acts companies must fulfill. Similarly to economic responsibilities, legal responsibilities are requirements for organizations to engage in business practices. Some legalities that businesses must enforce are security labour laws, environmental laws, criminal laws, and many others. In order to successfully execute this responsibility, organizations must be strongly aware of the laws that apply to them.

Company-Imposed Responsibilities

Unlike the mandatory responsibilities, self-imposed responsibilities are undertaken by businesses due to the owners and/ or employees’ desires to have a positive impact within their environment. These responsibilities can be described as Ethical and Philanthropic.

Ethical Responsibilities

Ethical responsibilities pertain to the duty of following a morally correct path. This is not an obligation for organizations but rather a self-imposed mandate. Some activities that fall under this umbrella are practicing honesty with all stakeholders, being respectful to customers, and ensuring that all promises made are fulfilled.

Philanthropic Responsibilities

The philanthropic responsibilities are those responsibilities taken on by companies that want to go above and beyond their call of duty. This section is highly denoted by organizations’ charitable actions such as service or monetary donations for specific community events and the implementation of processes to engage in environmentally friendly business practices. These are the responsibilities that truly differentiate businesses amongst their competitors while building a strong rapport with consumers.



Should ‘Sustainability’ Be Banned?

29 08 2013

Green Printer Online Dispatch

Is the oft-used term “sustainability” now just an empty buzz word? The Guardian seems to think so. Or at least one of the contributors to the site’s Green Blog does.

Blog writer Doug King argues that because companies now use the idea of sustainability as “just another tick-box” to show they are no worse than any of their competitors, the term has lost its efficacy.

“As with many aspects of business, the innovators and early adopters have a clear understanding of what they are doing and why. However, by the time that new practice features in business handbooks, it has become a fad that must be followed in order to maintain market share,” he says.

And because the term is so closely associated with the trendy concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR), the word is not only ineffective but actually doing harm to the cause.

In King’s mind, the idea of CSR was that companies considered their actions, what sort of impact they would have on the world around them and made decisions based on that analysis. But because CSR has become a fad, companies aren’t truly concerned about creating a positive impact—instead, their goal is to meet just another minimum set of requirements to keep them competitive.

And while that’s a decent point, does intention matter all that much as long as some progress is being made?

 



 



10 Canadian Companies Make List of Most Sustainable in World

16 08 2013

Green Printer Online Dispatch

Canadian companies are often known for their efforts to be “green.” And 10 Canuck companies have been recognized for taking the concept of corporate social responsibility seriously.

Media and research company Corporate Knights compiles an annual list of the Global 100 companies that are the most sustainable in the world. And 10 of those just happen to be Canadian. And that’s something to both celebrate and a new standard to hold other companies to.

And surprisingly, many of the Canadian firms are mining corporation or major power players in industry. The top Canadian company to make the list at No. 21 was B.C.-based miner Teck Resources. Next up was Barrick Gold Corp. at No. 40, and Canadian National Railway at No. 57.

The report bases the rankings on a variety of statistics, including “green” factors such as energy and water consumption, and equality issues including the relative number of women on their board and CEO compensation.

 

 

 

 



German Village Takes Title of World’s Greenest

13 08 2013

A Green Printer Online Dispatch

While the fair Canadian city of Vancouver has the noble goal of becoming the greenest city in the world by 2020, there’s a small town in Germany that may have already earned that title.

The university town of Freiberg I’m Breisgau, nestled in southwest Germany’s Black Forest, is considered by many to be the “greenest” or most sustainable city in the world currently. According to a report from The Vancouver Sun, the town’s reliance on numerous solar panels for energy in both commercial and residential buildings plays a major role in the title.

It also helps that many of Freiberg’s approximately 230,000 residents either use public transit via the tram, bicycles or their own two legs to get them wherever they need to go.

Additionally, the city has several energy sustainable neighbourhoods, including one that is hailed as being the only one in the world that creates more energy than it consumes, which it then feeds back into the city’s power grid (for a tidy profit, of course).

Perhaps Canadian towns and companies could learn a thing or two from the way residents and workers in Freiberg tackle sustainability together.

 



Green Printer interviews entrepreneur Carmon Spagnola of m

10 06 2009

A Green Printer interview with Carmen Spagnola, entrepreneur and owner of m.

1. What made you want to start m?
I started m because I was a frustrated consumer.  I decided that  if I want to have access to smarter, more beautifully designed, more  responsible products and amenities for my home and family, I was going to have to create more demand.  Markets are a bit of a chicken-and-egg  relationship.  Many retailers will tell you that they only provide  what their customers want.  That is only part of my modus operandi. I want to showcase the possibility of a better performing future, so  much of what I sell and promote is currently considered ahead of the market.  But how will the market know what it wants if we don’t inspire it to want more?
Read the rest of this entry »



Substance 151: Modular design systems and visual vocabularies

30 04 2009

By contributing guest author Ida Cheinman, Principal and Creative Director of Substance 151, a strategic design agency for Green Printer‘s “Design Goes Green” series.

We live in a time when “sustainability” is topping the buzzword charts and a wave of greenwashing is flooding the mainstream. We live in a time of intense competition, gloomy economic forecasts and rapidly disappearing marketing budgets, but also in a time when more and more companies and organizations strive to uphold higher environmental and social values, making the shift to the triple bottom line economic model. Sustainability and social responsibility are the forces that drive many of today’s business decisions; they also change the way organizations re-think their branding and marketing strategies. As marketers and business leaders, we are faced with the challenge of finding differentiation by creating empowering and memorable brand experiences for our audiences in the increasingly crowded sustainable marketplace.

So, What are the rules? Read the rest of this entry »



Green Printer’s top picks for ‘meaningful’ Earth Day marketing

9 04 2009

Earth Day takes place this April 22nd.

As a green leader or entrepreneur, the day begs the question, what will you be doing?

In a mad public relations world that anchors on events as a tangible “touch point” in lieu of diving into the messier (and harder to track or control) world of ‘awareness’, Earth Day is one of many symbols (i.e. polar bears) we use when speaking to some of the starker and concrete practices of the planet’s ecological anxieties. Read the rest of this entry »



Junxion Strategy: Eleven tips to effectively market green

18 03 2009

A demonstration outside the Heavy Oil Conference in Calgary, Alberta drawing attention to the $2 billion dollar subsidy to the oil industry in Alberta for the Carbon Sequestration program.

By Contributing Writer Melissa Chungfat | Part of Green Printer‘s ‘Design Goes Green’ dispatch.

Thanks to blogs, websites, Facebook, and the ever-growing list of social media tools, people have the ability and power to educate themselves about anything they please. It is harder for companies to get away with lies about their products and misleading messages. People can easily look up “greenwashing” or “what is an organic product?” in a search engine and in a matter of seconds, they have a list of resources that cuts through the PR.

So how can companies who are taking sincere environmental initiatives market themselves credibly? Read the rest of this entry »



Why did corporations that ‘leaned’ toward green in 2008 perform better financially?

11 03 2009

Design Goes Green – The first of a series of articles by Green Printer on the cross-section between the environment, business and the creative communications industry.

By Contributing Writer Melissa Chungfat.

Every day we hear about companies going under and pub meals having more value than bank stocks. At at time when profits are low across the nation, some company executives think that now is not the time to implement environmental initiatives. So why did companies committed to sustainability in 2008 perform better that those that didn’t?

Management consulting firm A.T. Kearney did a study comparing the performances of  99 companies with strong commitments to sustainability against industry averages from May to November 2008. Companies that leaned towards green outperformed industry averages by 15% over the six months in 16 of the 18 industries. Read the rest of this entry »